How To Repair A Carpet

How To Repair A Carpet
How To Repair A Carpet
Video: How To Repair A Carpet
Video: How to repair carpet / fix or repair carpet 2023, February
Anonim

Even a carpet that is carefully looked after can be accidentally damaged. The carpet can be burned with cigarette ash. The sharp end of a broken toy that has been dropped can cut the carpet fibers down to the base. And stains from some liquids stubbornly resist shampoos and stain removers. But, if you have carpet scraps and some inexpensive tools at your disposal, you can safely and discreetly repair your carpet.

Hide the scraps if you're laying carpet, or ask your dealer if you're buying a house with carpets. If no cuttings remain, you can cut off some of the carpet in invisible places, such as under cabinets. Minor damage can be repaired by repairing the carpet pile or loop. If you do not have any carpet scraps, pull the threads around the edges of the carpet from the edges. New threads are sewn to the carpet with a rounded surgical needle with strong thread; You can make your own sewing needle by heating a regular sewing needle in a flame and bending it.

More extensive damage can be repaired with a patch. To avoid damaging the fibers on the right side, jacquard carpets must be unscrewed and a patch sewn on from the wrong side. On pile carpets, patches are placed on the front side using a piece of fabric and latex mastic. Surface tears, in which the top layer of the carpet has come off the base, are repaired from the front side by gluing; if the warp is visible around the hole, the carpet threads are sewn in this place. The tears, which also affected the base of the carpet, are repaired from the lower side. Never stick adhesive tape to the carpet face, even temporarily, as it cannot be torn off without damaging the carpet fibers.

Despite the fact that most repair methods are not difficult, they require patience. For example, take your time when replacing carpet threads; You will get the best results by sewing one thread per stitch in the damaged area. Apply the glue carefully so that excess does not get onto the surface of the carpet. Before cutting the patch, make sure it matches the pattern and grain direction of the damaged area. Always try to use the smallest piece of carpet first so that if you make a mistake, there is always material to correct the mistake. And if this is your first time doing work, take the time to practice on unnecessary trims before you start working on the carpet itself.

Preparation for the restoration of the pile. Using scissors with short curved ends (medical), cut the pile from the damaged area to the warp and remove the remains of cut threads or loops with tweezers. To help remove any remaining fiber, dampen the damaged area of ​​the carpet with a cotton and cloth swab soaked in gasoline, which softens the adhesive holding the threads in the warp. For replacement, pluck fibers or whole loop yarn from the edge or carpet trim.

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Sewing on the pile. Remove any remaining fiber from the cleaned area to expose the base. Thread the needle into the needle that matches the color and thickness of the warp. While holding the V-thread of the carpet with the tweezers, secure the thread at the warp and loop over the V-thread. Place a needle into the warp where the thread is anchored and gently pull the thread while pressing the carpet thread against the warp. Without cutting off the thread, sew a second V-shaped piece of carpet thread to the adjacent warp thread. Continue working until you have covered the entire surface of the base. Sew around the last piece of carpet thread several times to secure. On carpets with latex backing, spread the new fibers and dampen the carpet with a cotton swab soaked in gasoline to adhere the sewn threads to the backing. Trim the uneven ends of the new threads with scissors.

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Replacement of looped carpet threads. Press the hinges around the lint-free area. Using a semicircular needle, sew to the base a long piece of loose yarn from which the carpet loops are made, then sew another stitch to form a loop. Pull the buttonhole so that it matches the existing carpet loops. To do this, you can use a match or other object that will standardize the size of the loops (inset). Continue making loops without cutting the threads until the entire damaged area is filled. Secure the end of the yarn by sewing several repetitive stitches in one place.

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Placing a patch on a jacquard carpet

1. Release the tension on the carpet. Use a tensioner to reduce the tension on the carpet in the corner of the room closest to the damaged area. Use an awl to lift the carpet off the hooks of the grapple. When the corner is clear, remove the carpet from the grips along two walls.

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2. Cutting out the damaged area. Mark the corners of the damaged area on the face of the carpet with pins, which are inserted into the carpet and backing. Cut a stencil out of heavy cardboard to fit the area you marked, then fold the rug to reveal the underside. Position the stencil so that the edges are parallel to the warp threads. Use a linoleum knife to cut the damaged area along the edges of the stencil, trying to cut only along the base.

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3. Cutting out the patch. Place the carpet cut on the face of the unnecessary carpet trim. Align the grain directions with the pattern if the carpet is patterned, then insert pins into the carpet trim at the corners of the cut. Peel off the cut area, turn over the carpet trim and use a stencil to cut the patch as described in step 2.

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4. Installing the patch. To prevent fraying, apply a thin layer of glue to the edges of the carpet backing around the hole and edge of the patch. The glue should not get on the pile of the carpet. Match the grain direction and, if necessary, the patch pattern with the carpet pattern. Press the patch into place, starting at one corner towards the diagonally opposite corner. Use the blunt end of a needle to remove all carpet fibers to the right side.

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5. Sewing on the patch. Align the edges of the patch with the edges of the hole. Raise the two edges of the seam so that it is comfortable to sew, and sew the two edges with thick thread alternately with long (30 mm) and short (20 mm) stitches. Periodically inspect the surface of the carpet and loosen the carpet fibers caught in the seam. After sewing on the patch, flatten the carpet and pull it over the hooks using the tensioner. Place the weight on the patch for several hours so that the fibers straighten out and the patch becomes invisible.

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Placing a patch on a bulky pile carpet

1. Attaching the damaged area to the floor. If the carpet is taut with the grips, place strips of carpet scraps around the damaged area about 200 mm from the edges of the damaged area and attach them with 25 mm furniture nails at 75 mm intervals. This procedure reduces the tension on the carpet in the patch area. If the carpet is attached with adhesive tape or is lying loose on the floor, there is no need to attach it.

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2. Cutting out the damaged area. Make a stencil from cardboard to the size of the damaged area and place it on the carpet. Use the blunt side of the linoleum knife blade to part the carpet pile in the middle along the edges of the stencil, then spread the pile with your fingers. Cut through the base of the carpet using a stencil, being careful not to cut the backing, then lift the cut off one corner and remove it. Cut off the patch from the carpet trim using the cut out to align the pile direction with the pattern and a stencil for easier knife work.

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3. Installing the fabric tape. The patch will be held in place with fabric and mastic tapes on the back of the carpet. Cut four strips of fabric so that they are approximately 25 mm longer than the sides of the hole. Apply a thin layer of latex mastic to the tape and place the tape under the edges of the hole so that the joint lines are in the center of the tape. Apply a thin layer of glue to the edges of the hole, taking care not to get any glue on the pile of the carpet.

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4. Attach the patch. Combine the slope of the fibers and the pattern of the patch and carpet. Press the patch into place, starting at one corner towards the diagonally opposite corner, being careful not to smudge the face of the carpet with glue. Slide the edges of the hole and patch together and press down with your palms. Use an awl to loosen the carpet fibers or loops that are caught in the seam, then use your fingers to smooth the carpet and patch fibers so that they blend and the seam becomes invisible. Load the seam for several hours with a stack of books. If the carpet is taut on the hooks, after about five hours, remove the temporarily nailed strips from the carpet scraps and re-tension the carpet with a tension tool.

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Surface tear repair

1. Application of mastic. If the backing is not damaged, lift the torn off section of the carpet, remove the lint and spread a thin film of mastic on the backing.

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2. Sealing the tear. While holding the edges of the tear with your hand, smooth the carpet with a smooth object, such as a lemonade bottle. Pressing the carpet firmly, move the bottle in the direction from the tear in different directions to evenly distribute the mastic under the carpet between the fibers without squeezing it to the surface. If adhesive does come out on the surface, remove it immediately with water and carpet shampoo. Sew on the loose fibers four to five hours after the glue dries.

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Repair of gaps

Sewing up a jacquard carpet. Using a tensioner and an awl, remove the carpet from the hooks in one corner, then roll the carpet so that the tear is visible from the wrong side. Keeping the edges of the tear at an angle so that it is comfortable to sew, sew the two edges with thick thread alternately with long (30 mm) and short (20 mm) stitches. Cut a tape from the fabric that will cover the tear and spread a thin layer of latex mastic on it. Let the mastic dry for a few minutes and press the tape firmly against the sewn-up tear on the seamy side of the carpet. Unfold the carpet and pull it over the hooks using the tensioner.

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Using adhesive tape. Foam carpets can be repaired as described above, or with adhesive tape. Lift the carpet off the hooks or peel the double-sided tape off the floor and roll the carpet over. Align the edges of the tear, then press about 50mm single-sided adhesive tape against them to cover both edges. Wait a few hours, then unfold the carpet and secure it to the grips or, if the carpet is foam backed, tape it to the floor with double-sided tape.

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